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How to Duplicate a Page or Post in WordPress

Table of Contents

Duplicating pages and posts in WordPress can be useful for a variety of reasons, such as creating multiple versions of a page for A/B testing or creating a template for similar content. There are several ways to do this, including manually duplicating the page or post, using a plugin, or even writing your own plugin to handle duplication. In this article, we’ll cover all these methods so you can choose the one that best fits your needs.

Duplicate a Page or Post Manually

Gutenberg Editor

One way to duplicate a page or post in WordPress is to do it manually. This method works with both the Classic Editor and the Gutenberg Editor, so you can use it regardless of which one you’re using. Here’s how to do it in each editor:

Classic Editor

  1. Go to the page or post you want to duplicate and click on “Edit” to open it in the WordPress editor.
  2. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and click on the “Copy to a new draft” button. This will create a copy of the page or post and save it as a draft.
  3. A new draft will be created and opened in the WordPress editor. You can now edit and customize it as needed, and then publish it when you’re ready.

Gutenberg Editor

  1. Go to the page or post you want to duplicate and click on “Edit” to open it in the WordPress editor.
  2. Click on the three dots in the top-right corner of the editor and select “Copy all content”. This will copy the entire page or post, including its blocks, to your clipboard.
  3. Create a new page or post by clicking on “Add New” from the WordPress dashboard.
  4. Click on the plus sign in the top-left corner of the editor to add a new block.
  5. Select the “Classic” block and paste the content you copied earlier into it.
  6. You can now edit and customize the page or post as needed, and then publish it when you’re ready.

Duplicate a Page or Post Using a Plugin

Another way to duplicate a page or post in WordPress is to use a plugin. There are several plugins available that allow you to easily duplicate pages and posts with a single click. Here are a few popular options:

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  • Duplicate Post is a popular plugin that allows you to duplicate pages and posts with a single click. It also provides options for renaming the duplicated post and changing its status (e.g. from draft to published).
  • WP Clone by WP Academy is another plugin that allows you to easily duplicate pages and posts. It also provides the option to clone an entire WordPress site, which can be useful for creating staging or development environments.
  • Post Duplicator is a simple plugin that allows you to duplicate pages and posts with a single click. It also provides options for changing the status and author of the duplicated post.

To use one of these plugins, simply install and activate it on your WordPress site, and then follow the instructions provided by the plugin to duplicate a page or post.

Duplicate Post

Duplicate Post

The Duplicate Post plugin is a handy tool for WordPress users that allows you to easily clone or duplicate posts, pages, and custom post types within your WordPress site. This can be helpful if you want to create similar content quickly, or if you want to save a draft version of a post while you work on a new version.

How to Install the Duplicate Post Plugin

To install the Duplicate Post plugin, follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Plugins menu in your WordPress dashboard.
  2. Click the “Add New” button.
  3. In the search field, type “Duplicate Post” and press Enter.
  4. The Duplicate Post plugin should appear in the search results. Click the “Install Now” button to install it.
  5. After the plugin has finished installing, click the “Activate” button to enable it.

How to Use the Duplicate Post Plugin

Using the Duplicate Post plugin is simple:

  1. Go to the post, page, or custom post type that you want to duplicate.
  2. In the WordPress editor, click the “Copy to a new draft” or “Clone” button, depending on which version of the plugin you are using.
  3. A new draft of the post will be created, and you will be taken to the WordPress editor for the new draft.

Customizing the Duplicate Post Plugin Settings

The Duplicate Post plugin has several settings that you can customize to suit your needs. To access these settings, follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Settings menu in your WordPress dashboard.
  2. Click the “Duplicate Post” link.
  3. On the Duplicate Post settings page, you can customize various options, such as which post types can be duplicated, which meta boxes should be copied over, and whether to include the original post’s attachments and featured image.

Tips for Using the Duplicate Post Plugin

Here are a few tips for using the Duplicate Post plugin effectively:

  1. Be sure to give your duplicated post a new title and permalink to avoid confusion.
  2. If you are duplicating a post with many images or other attachments, you may want to uncheck the “Copy attachments” option in the plugin settings to avoid duplicating large amounts of data.
  3. If you want to duplicate a post and immediately publish it, you can use the “Clone and Edit” button instead of the “Copy to a new draft” button.

WP Clone by WP Academy Plugin

WP Clone by WP Academy Plugin

The WP Clone by WP Academy plugin is a powerful tool for WordPress users that allows you to easily clone or migrate your entire WordPress site to a new domain or hosting provider. This can be helpful if you want to create a staging or development site for testing, or if you want to move your site to a new host without having to manually transfer all of your content and settings.

How to Install the WP Clone by WP Academy Plugin

To install the WP Clone by WP Academy plugin, follow these steps:

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  1. Go to the Plugins menu in your WordPress dashboard.
  2. Click the “Add New” button.
  3. In the search field, type “WP Clone by WP Academy” and press Enter.
  4. The WP Clone by WP Academy plugin should appear in the search results. Click the “Install Now” button to install it.
  5. After the plugin has finished installing, click the “Activate” button to enable it.

How to Use the WP Clone by WP Academy Plugin

Using the WP Clone by WP Academy plugin is simple:

  1. Go to the WP Clone by WP Academy menu in your WordPress dashboard.
  2. Click the “Create Backup” button to create a backup of your current site.
  3. Once the backup is complete, click the “Download Backup” button to download the backup file to your computer.
  4. Go to the WordPress dashboard of the site where you want to restore the backup.
  5. Go to the WP Clone by WP Academy menu and click the “Restore Backup” button.
  6. Select the backup file that you downloaded in Step 3 and click the “Restore” button.

Customizing the WP Clone by WP Academy Plugin Settings

The WP Clone by WP Academy plugin has several settings that you can customize to suit your needs. To access these settings, follow these steps:

  1. Go to the WP Clone by WP Academy menu in your WordPress dashboard.
  2. Click the “Settings” link.
  3. On the WP Clone by WP Academy settings page, you can customize various options, such as which post types and media files should be included in the backup, and whether to exclude certain directories or files from the backup.

Tips for Using the WP Clone by WP Academy Plugin

Here are a few tips for using the WP Clone by WP Academy plugin effectively:

  1. Be sure to create a backup of your site before restoring a backup to prevent data loss.
  2. If you are restoring a backup to a site with a different URL, be sure to update the site URL in the General Settings menu after the restore is complete.
  3. If you are restoring a backup to a site with a different domain name, you may need to update your DNS settings to point to the new domain.

Post Duplicator

Post Duplicator

The Post Duplicator plugin is a useful tool for WordPress users that allows you to easily duplicate or clone posts, pages, and custom post types within your WordPress site. This can be helpful if you want to create similar content quickly, or if you want to save a draft version of a post while you work on a new version.

How to Install the Post Duplicator Plugin

To install the Post Duplicator plugin, follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Plugins menu in your WordPress dashboard.
  2. Click the “Add New” button.
  3. In the search field, type “Post Duplicator” and press Enter.
  4. The Post Duplicator plugin should appear in the search results. Click the “Install Now” button to install it.
  5. After the plugin has finished installing, click the “Activate” button to enable it.

Using the Post Duplicator plugin is simple:

  1. Go to the post, page, or custom post type that you want to duplicate.
  2. In the WordPress editor, click the “Duplicate” button.
  3. A new draft of the post will be created, and you will be taken to the WordPress editor for the new draft.

Customizing the Post Duplicator Plugin Settings

The Post Duplicator plugin has several settings that you can customize to suit your needs. To access these settings, follow these steps:

  1. Go to the Settings menu in your WordPress dashboard.
  2. Click the “Post Duplicator” link.
  3. On the Post Duplicator settings page, you can customize various options, such as which post types can be duplicated, which meta boxes should be copied over, and whether to include the original post’s attachments and featured image.

Tips for Using the Post Duplicator Plugin

Here are a few tips for using the Post Duplicator plugin effectively:

  1. Be sure to give your duplicated post a new title and permalink to avoid confusion.
  2. If you are duplicating a post with many images or other attachments, you may want to uncheck the “Copy attachments” option in the plugin settings to avoid duplicating large amounts of data.
  3. If you want to duplicate a post and immediately publish it, you can use the “Duplicate and Publish” button instead of the “Duplicate” button.

Duplicate Page or Post in Bulk

If you need to duplicate multiple pages or posts at once, you can use a plugin to do this in bulk. One popular plugin for bulk duplication is Bulk Page Clone. This plugin allows you to select multiple pages or posts and clone them with a single click. It also provides options for customizing the cloned pages or posts, such as changing their titles, status, and authors.

To use the Bulk Page Clone plugin, simply install and activate it on your WordPress site, and then follow these steps:

  1. Go to the “Pages” or “Posts” section of your WordPress dashboard and select the pages or posts you want to clone.
  2. Click on the “Bulk Actions” dropdown menu and select “Clone”.
  3. Click on the “Apply” button to clone the selected pages or posts.
  4. The plugin will create new drafts of the cloned pages or posts, which you can then edit and customize as needed.

Write Your Own Post Duplication Plugin

Write Your Own Post Duplication Plugin

Method 1

Step 1: Create the Plugin Folder and File

The first step in creating a WordPress plugin is to create a folder for your plugin files and a main plugin file.

  1. In your WordPress installation, navigate to the “wp-content/plugins” folder.
  2. Create a new folder for your plugin and give it a unique name (e.g. “post-duplication-plugin”).
  3. Inside the new folder, create a new file and name it “post-duplication-plugin.php”.

Step 2: Add the Plugin Header Information

Next, you’ll need to add some basic information about your plugin to the top of the “post-duplication-plugin.php” file. This information is known as the plugin header and is used by WordPress to identify and display your plugin in the plugin list.

To add the plugin header information, open the “post-duplication-plugin.php” file in your code editor and add the following code at the top:

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: Post Duplication Plugin
Plugin URI: https://example.com/post-duplication-plugin
Description: A plugin for duplicating posts in WordPress
Version: 1.0
Author: Your Name
Author URI: https://example.com
*/

Be sure to replace the placeholder values with your own plugin details.

Step 3: Create the Plugin Functionality

Now that you’ve set up the basic structure of your plugin, it’s time to add the functionality for duplicating posts.

First, you’ll need to create a function that handles the duplication process. Add the following code to your “post-duplication-plugin.php” file:

function post_duplication_functionality($post_id) {
  // Duplication code goes here
}

Next, you’ll need to add the code that actually performs the post duplication process. To do this, you’ll need to use several WordPress functions to retrieve the original post, create a new post, and copy over the necessary data.

The first step is to retrieve the original post using the get_post() function. This function takes a post ID as an argument and returns the post object. Add the following code to your post_duplication_functionality() function:

// Get the original post
$post = get_post($post_id);

Next, you’ll need to create a new post using the wp_insert_post() function. This function takes an array of post data as an argument and returns the ID of the newly created post.

Add the following code to your post_duplication_functionality() function to create a new draft post with the same title and content as the original:

// Create a new post
$new_post = array(
  'post_title' => $post->post_title,
  'post_content' => $post->post_content,
  'post_status' => 'draft', // Change this to your desired status (e.g. publish)
  'post_author' => $post->post_author,
  'post_type' => $post->post_type
);

$new_post_id = wp_insert_post($new_post);

Now that you have the original post and a new post created, you can copy over any additional data that you want to include in the duplicated post. This can include things like post metadata, taxonomy terms, and featured images.

To copy post metadata, you can use the update_post_meta() function. This function takes the ID of the new post, the meta key, and the meta value as arguments.

// Copy post metadata
$meta_keys = get_post_custom_keys($post_id);
if (!empty($meta_keys)) {
  foreach ($meta_keys as $meta_key) {
    $meta_values = get_post_custom_values($meta_key, $post_id);
    foreach ($meta_values as $meta_value) {
      add_post_meta($new_post_id, $meta_key, $meta_value);
    }
  }
}

To copy taxonomy terms, you can use the wp_set_object_terms() function. This function takes the ID of the new post, the taxonomy name, and an array of term IDs as arguments.

// Copy taxonomy terms
$taxonomies = get_object_taxonomies($post->post_type);
foreach ($taxonomies as $taxonomy) {
  $terms = wp_get_object_terms($post_id, $taxonomy, array('fields' => 'ids'));
  wp_set_object_terms($new_post_id, $terms, $taxonomy);
}

To copy the featured image, you can use the set_post_thumbnail() function. This function takes the ID of the new post and the ID of the featured image as arguments.

Add the following code to your post_duplication_functionality() function to copy the featured image from the original post to the new post:

// Copy featured image
$featured_image_id = get_post_thumbnail_id($post_id);
if ($featured_image_id) {
  set_post_thumbnail($new_post_id, $featured_image_id);
}

With all of the necessary data copied over, your post duplication function is now complete. However, you’ll still need to add a way for users to trigger the duplication process.

Step 4: Add a Duplication Button to the Post Edit Screen

To make it easy for users to duplicate posts, you can add a button to the post edit screen that triggers the duplication function when clicked.

To do this, you’ll need to use the add_action() function to hook into the post_submitbox_start action and add a custom button to the post edit screen.

Add the following code to your post_duplication_functionality() function:

function post_duplication_button() {
  global $post;
  if (isset($post) && $post->post_type === 'post') { // Only add button for post post type
    $nonce = wp_create_nonce('duplicate_post_' . $post->ID);
    $duplicate_url = admin_url('admin-ajax.php?action=duplicate_post&post_id=' . $post->ID . '&_wpnonce=' . $nonce);
    echo '<div id="duplicate-action"><a class="submitduplicate duplication" href="' . $duplicate_url . '">Duplicate</a></div>';
  }
}
add_action('post_submitbox_start', 'post_duplication_button');

This code will add a “Duplicate” button to the post edit screen for all posts. When clicked, it will trigger an AJAX request to the duplicate_post action with the post ID and a nonce for security.

Step 5: Handle the AJAX Request

To handle the AJAX request triggered by the duplication button, you’ll need to use the wp_ajax_ hook to register a callback function for the duplicate_post action.

Add the following code to your post_duplication_functionality() function:

function duplicate_post() {
  if (!isset($_POST['post_id']) || !isset($_POST['_wpnonce'])) {
    wp_send_json_error();
  }
 
  $post_id = (int) $_POST['post_id'];
  $nonce = sanitize_key($_POST['_wpnonce']);
 
  if (!wp_verify_nonce($nonce, 'duplicate_post_' . $post_id)) {
    wp_send_json_error();
  }
 
  $new_post_id = post_duplication_functionality($post_id);
 
  if ($new_post_id) {
    wp_send_json_success(array('redirect' => get_edit_post_link($new_post_id)));
  } else {
    wp_send_json_error();
  }
}
add_action('wp_ajax_duplicate_post', 'duplicate_post');

This code will handle the AJAX request triggered by the duplication button. It first checks for the required post_id and _wpnonce parameters, and then verifies the nonce to ensure that the request is valid.

If the request is valid, it calls the post_duplication_functionality() function to perform the post duplication and sends a success response with a redirect URL to the new post edit screen. If the request is invalid or the duplication fails, it sends an error response.

Step 6: Enqueue Scripts and Styles

To make the duplication button function properly, you’ll need to enqueue the necessary scripts and styles.

Add the following code to your post_duplication_functionality() function to enqueue the necessary scripts and styles:

function enqueue_scripts_and_styles() {
  wp_enqueue_script('duplication-script', plugin_dir_url(__FILE__) . 'duplication-script.js', array('jquery'), '1.0', true);
  wp_enqueue_style('duplication-style', plugin_dir_url(__FILE__) . 'duplication-style.css');
}
add_action('admin_enqueue_scripts', 'enqueue_scripts_and_styles');

Be sure to replace duplication-script.js and duplication-style.css with the names of your own script and style files.

Step 7: Create the Script and Style Files

To complete the plugin, you’ll need to create the script and style files that you enqueued in the previous step.

Create a new file called duplication-script.js in your plugin folder and add the following code:

jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
  $('.duplication').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
 
    var $this = $(this);
    var post_id = $this.data('post_id');
    var nonce = $this.data('nonce');
 
    $this.attr('disabled', true);
 
    $.ajax({
      type: 'POST',
      url: ajaxurl,
      data: {
        action: 'duplicate_post',
        post_id: post_id,
        _wpnonce: nonce
      },
      success: function(response) {
        if (response.success) {
          window.location.href = response.data.redirect;
        } else {
          alert('Error duplicating post');
        }
      },
      error: function(response) {
        alert('Error duplicating post');
      },
      complete: function() {
        $this.attr('disabled', false);
      }
    });
  });
});

This script handles the click event of the duplication button and makes an AJAX request to the duplicate_post action with the post ID and nonce. It then handles the success and error responses and updates the button state accordingly.

Create a new file called duplication-style.css in your plugin folder and add the following code to style the duplication button:

#duplicate-action {
  float: right;
}

#duplicate-action a.duplication {
  display: inline-block;
  padding: 6px 12px;
  font-size: 14px;
  font-weight: 400;
  line-height: 1.42857143;
  text-align: center;
  white-space: nowrap;
  vertical-align: middle;
  -ms-touch-action: manipulation;
  touch-action: manipulation;
  cursor: pointer;
  -webkit-user-select: none;
  -moz-user-select: none;
  -ms-user-select: none;
  user-select: none;
  background-image: none;
  border: 1px solid transparent;
  border-radius: 4px;
  color: #fff;
  background-color: #337ab7;
  border-color: #2e6da4;
}

#duplicate-action a.duplication:hover {
  color: #fff;
  background-color: #286090;
  border-color: #204d74;
}

This CSS styles the duplication button to match the default WordPress button style.

Step 8: Test Your Plugin

With all of the code in place, your post duplication plugin is now complete. To test it, activate the plugin and go to a post edit screen. You should see a “Duplicate” button in the top right corner of the screen.

Click the button to trigger the duplication process and confirm that a new draft post is created with the same title and content as the original.

Congratulations, you have now created your own post duplication plugin!

Method 2

Step 1: Creating the Plugin Folder and PHP File

The first thing you’ll need to do is create a new folder for your plugin in the wp-content/plugins directory. You can name this folder whatever you like, but it’s a good idea to use a descriptive name that reflects the purpose of your plugin. In this case, we’ll call our plugin “Post Duplication.”

Next, create a new PHP file in the plugin folder and name it post-duplication.php. This will be the main plugin file, and it’s where we’ll define the plugin’s functions and hooks.

At the top of the post-duplication.php file, you’ll need to include some basic information about your plugin. This includes the plugin name, version number, and a brief description. Here’s an example of what this might look like:

<?php
/*
Plugin Name: Post Duplication
Plugin URI: https://example.com/post-duplication
Description: A plugin for duplicating posts in WordPress
Version: 1.0
Author: Your Name
Author URI: https://example.com
License: GPL2
*/

Step 2: Creating the Plugin Functions

Now that we have our plugin files set up, it’s time to start writing the code that will make our plugin work. First, let’s create a function for duplicating a post. We’ll call this function duplicate_post().

The duplicate_post() function will accept a single argument, which will be the ID of the post that we want to duplicate. It will then create a new post based on the original post, using the wp_insert_post() function.

The wp_insert_post() function is a powerful WordPress function that allows you to create a new post or update an existing one. It takes an array of post data as an argument, and returns the ID of the new or updated post.

To create a new post, we’ll pass an array of post data to the wp_insert_post() function. This array should include at least the post_title, post_content, and post_type parameters. We can also include other optional parameters, such as post_status, post_author, post_excerpt, and post_date.

Here’s what the duplicate_post() function might look like:

function duplicate_post($post_id) {
  $post = get_post($post_id); // Get the original post
  $new_post_data = array(
    'post_title' => $post->post_title . ' (Copy)', // Append 'Copy' to the post title
    'post_status' => 'draft', // Set the status to draft
    'post_type' => $post->post_type, // Use the same post type
    'post_author' => $post->post_author, // Use the same post author
    'post_content' => $post->post_content, // Use the same post content
    'post_excerpt' => $post->post_excerpt, // Use the same post excerpt
    'post_date' => $post->post_date, // Use the same post date
  );
  $new_post_id = wp_insert_post($new_post_data); // Insert the new post
  return $new_post_id; // Return the ID of the new post
}

In this function, we first retrieve the original post using the get_post() function. This function takes a post ID as an argument and returns the post object.

We then create an array of post data for the new post, based on the original post. We use the post_title, post_type, post_author, post_content, post_excerpt, and post_date from the original post, and set the post_status to ‘draft’.

Finally, we pass the new post data array to the wp_insert_post() function to create the new post, and return the ID of the new post.

Step 3: Hooking Into WordPress Actions and Filters

Now that we have our duplicate_post() function set up, we need to hook it into the appropriate WordPress actions and filters so that it can be triggered when needed.

There are several ways we could do this, but one option is to use the admin_action_ hook. This hook allows us to trigger our function when a specific action is performed in the WordPress admin area.

To use the admin_action_ hook, we’ll need to add a new function that hooks into the hook and triggers our duplicate_post() function. We’ll call this function duplicate_post_admin_action().

Here’s what the duplicate_post_admin_action() function might look like:

function duplicate_post_admin_action() {
  // Check if the 'duplicate_post' action has been triggered
  if (isset($_GET['action']) && $_GET['action'] == 'duplicate_post') {
    // Check if the user has permission to duplicate posts
    if (!current_user_can('edit_posts')) {
      wp_die('You do not have permission to duplicate posts');
    }
    // Check if a post ID has been specified
    if (isset($_GET['post']) && is_numeric($_GET['post'])) {
      $post_id = (int) $_GET['post']; // Cast the post ID to an integer
      $new_post_id = duplicate_post($post_id); // Duplicate the post
      // Redirect to the edit screen for the new post
      wp_redirect(admin_url('post.php?action=edit&post=' . $new_post_id));
      exit;
    } else {
      // No post ID was specified, so display an error message
      wp_die('No post ID was specified');
    }
  }
}
add_action('admin_action_duplicate_post', 'duplicate_post_admin_action');

In this function, we first check if the duplicate_post action has been triggered. If it has, we check if the current user has permission to edit posts. If they don’t, we display an error message using the wp_die() function.

Next, we check if a post ID has been specified. If it has, we cast the post ID to an integer and pass it to our duplicate_post() function to create the new post. We then redirect the user to the edit screen for the new post using the wp_redirect() function.

If no post ID was specified, we display an error message using the wp_die() function.

Finally, we hook our duplicate_post_admin_action() function into the admin_action_duplicate_post hook using the add_action() function. This will trigger our function whenever the duplicate_post action is performed in the WordPress admin area.

Step 4: Adding a Link to Duplicate the Post

Now that we have our duplicate_post() function and duplicate_post_admin_action() hook set up, we need a way for users to trigger the duplicate_post action and duplicate a post. One way to do this is to add a link to the post edit screen that will trigger the action when clicked.

To add the link, we’ll use the post_row_actions filter. This filter allows us to add custom actions to the row of links displayed below each post on the post list screen.

To use the post_row_actions filter, we’ll need to create a new function that hooks into the filter and adds our custom link. We’ll call this function duplicate_post_link().

Here’s what the duplicate_post_link() function might look like:

function duplicate_post_link($actions, $post) {
  // Check if the user has permission to duplicate posts
  if (current_user_can('edit_posts')) {
    // Add a 'Duplicate' link to the actions array
    $actions['duplicate'] = '<a href="' . admin_url('admin.php?action=duplicate_post&post=' . $post->ID) . '">Duplicate</a>';
  }
  return $actions;
}
add_filter('post_row_actions', 'duplicate_post_link', 10, 2);

In this function, we first check if the current user has permission to edit posts. If they do, we add a ‘Duplicate’ link to the $actions array. The link points to the admin.php page and includes the duplicate_post action and the post ID as query parameters.

Finally, we return the modified $actions array.

We then hook our duplicate_post_link() function into the post_row_actions filter using the add_filter() function. This will add our custom link to the row of links displayed below each post on the post list screen.

Step 5: Testing the Plugin

Now that we’ve completed our plugin, it’s time to test it out and see if it works as expected.

To test the plugin, first activate it in the WordPress admin area by going to the Plugins page and clicking the ‘Activate’ link.

Once the plugin is activated, go to the Posts page and hover over one of the posts. You should see a ‘Duplicate’ link in the row of links below the post.

Click the ‘Duplicate’ link to trigger the duplicate_post action and duplicate the post. You should be redirected to the edit screen for the new post, which should be a copy of the original post.

If everything is working as expected, you’re ready to start using your new post duplication plugin!

Method 3

If you’re comfortable with coding, you can even write your own plugin to handle post duplication in WordPress. This can be a useful option if you want to customize the duplication process to meet your specific needs.

To create a custom post duplication plugin, you’ll need to create a new WordPress plugin and use the wp_insert_post() function to create a new post based on the original post. You can also use the wp_update_post() function to customize the new post, such as changing its title, status, and author.

Here’s a basic example of how you can use these functions to create a custom post duplication plugin:

// Duplicate a post
function duplicate_post($post_id) {
  // Get the original post
  $post = get_post($post_id);

  // Create a new post based on the original post
  $new_post_id = wp_insert_post(array(
    'post_title' => $post->post_title,
    'post_content' => $post->post_content,
    'post_status' => 'draft',
    'post_type' => $post->post_type
  ));

  // Customize the new post as needed
  wp_update_post(array(
    'ID' => $new_post_id,
    'post_title' => 'Duplicate of ' . $post->post_title,
    'post_status' => 'published'
  ));

  return $new_post_id;
}

// Hook into the 'save_post' action to run the duplication function
add_action('save_post', 'duplicate_post');

This example will create a new draft of the original post when it is saved, and then update the new post with a modified title and status (published). You can customize this code as needed to fit your specific requirements.

For example, you can add additional fields to the wp_update_post() function to customize the new post even further. For instance, you can change the post’s author, date, or even its content by using the following fields:

  • 'post_author': ID of the user who should be set as the post’s author
  • 'post_date': Date of the post in the format ‘YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS’
  • 'post_date_gmt': Date of the post in GMT time in the format ‘YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS’
  • 'post_content': The post’s content

You can also use the wp_update_post() function to add custom fields to the new post. Custom fields are extra pieces of information that you can add to a post to store additional data. For example, you might want to store a custom field for the original post’s URL or a custom field for the post’s author name.

To add a custom field to a post, you can use the add_post_meta() function. Here’s an example of how you could use this function to add a custom field to the new post:

// Add a custom field to the new post
add_post_meta($new_post_id, 'original_post_url', get_permalink($post_id));

This code will add a custom field to the new post with the key ‘original_post_url’ and the value of the original post’s URL. You can then use this custom field to display the original post’s URL on the new post, or use it for any other purpose you might need.

You can also use the update_post_meta() function to update custom fields on an existing post. For example, you might want to update the value of the ‘original_post_url’ custom field if the URL of the original post changes. Here’s an example of how you can use the update_post_meta() function to update a custom field:

// Update a custom field on the new post
update_post_meta($new_post_id, 'original_post_url', 'https://example.com/new-url/');

This code will update the ‘original_post_url’ custom field on the new post with a new value of ‘https://example.com/new-url/‘.

You can also use the delete_post_meta() function to delete custom fields from a post. For example, you might want to delete a custom field if it is no longer needed or if it contains incorrect data. Here’s an example of how you can use the delete_post_meta() function to delete a custom field:

// Delete a custom field from the new post
delete_post_meta($new_post_id, 'original_post_url');

This code will delete the ‘original_post_url’ custom field from the new post.

You can also use the get_post_meta() function to retrieve the value of a custom field for a given post. For example, you might want to display the value of the ‘original_post_url’ custom field on the new post. Here’s an example of how you can use the get_post_meta() function to retrieve a custom field:

// Get the value of a custom field from the new post
$original_post_url = get_post_meta($new_post_id, 'original_post_url', true);

This code will retrieve the value of the ‘original_post_url’ custom field for the new post and store it in the $original_post_url variable. You can then use this variable to display the value of the custom field on the new post, or use it for any other purpose you might need.

Custom fields can be a useful way to store additional information about a post in WordPress. However, it’s important to use them responsibly and only store information that is relevant to the post. Storing too much unnecessary information as custom fields can make your WordPress site slower and harder to manage.

In conclusion, custom fields can be a useful way to store additional information about a post in WordPress. Whether you need to display the original post’s URL on the new post, or store any other information, you can use the add_post_meta(), update_post_meta(), delete_post_meta(), and get_post_meta() functions to manage custom fields on your WordPress site. Just be sure to use them responsibly and only store necessary information to keep your site running smoothly.

Conclusion for Duplicate Page Article

In this article, we taught you how to duplicate pages and posts in WordPress. Be sure to test what is stated in the article before testing it on a live website. You can either write your own plugin or use ready-made plugins. I hope this guide has been of use to you. See you in the next article.

Picture of Katerina Valeria
Katerina Valeria
Hi there! My name is Catherine and I am a professional content creator with a focus on WordPress. I write blog articles for Gloria Themes, sharing my knowledge and expertise on all things related to this popular website platform.

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